How to Single Crochet for Beginners (SC) – A Step-by-Step Tutorial

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Are you ready to learn how to work single crochet? This comprehensive guide on how to crochet single crochet stitch for beginners will provide you with everything you need to know.

By the end of this blog post, you’ll be well-equipped to create a wide variety of crochet projects with confidence and ease.

Step-by-step guide how to single crochet for beginners

Commonly shortened to SC, the single crochet stitch is beginner-friendly, easy to grasp, and enjoyable to crochet.

Due to its widespread use in various patterns and projects, single crochet is typically the first stitch taught to beginners.

The beauty of the SC is its adaptability – it can be worked in rows, joined rounds, or continuous rounds, making it a truly versatile stitch.

How to Single Crochet

Shortly, here is how to work single crochet stitch

Step 1. Insert hook into the next stitch ( or the indicated stitch ), yarn over, and pull up a loop.

Step 2. Yarn over again and pull through both loops on the hook.

This is it. But if you are reading this post, it means that you need a step-by-step photo tutorial and an in depth information for the SC stitch.

So, in this tutorial, we’ll explore what a single crochet stitch is, how to crochet it, and the best situations to use it in. I’ll also give you a heads-up about some typical mistakes you should avoid.

What is the Single Crochet stitch

As a fundamental crochet stitch, the single crochet is the building block for countless crochet patterns and serves as the perfect starting point for beginners. It is mostly used for amigurumi and doll patterns, but not only. It can be used to crochet top-down beanies, scarves, and baby blankets as well.

Basic Terminology and understanding of single crochet

Getting to grips with crochet terminology is essential for interpreting patterns and interacting with fellow crocheters.

Additionally, knowing the difference between US and UK terminology can help you avoid confusion when working with international patterns.

Abbreviation

In the US, single crochet is abbreviated as SC, while in the UK, it is called double crochet and abbreviated as DC.

Familiarizing yourself with these terms, along with other common abbreviations and symbols, will make it much easier to navigate crochet patterns and tutorials.

In this blog post, I use the standard US crochet terminology.

Chart symbols

In the crochet charts, the single crochet stitch is symbolized by ” X ” or ” + “

Turning chain

Once you’ve finished a row of single crochet, the next step is to flip your work around and create a single chain. This chain one isn’t considered as a stitch, but it’s crucial as it elevates the first stitch to the appropriate height for the next row.

Single crochet stitch guide

In this section, I will guide you through how to single crochet for beginners, single crochet into a foundation chain, and how to work a single crochet in rows.

To start with a single crochet, you’ll need some yarn and a crochet hook compatible with the yarn you’ve chosen.

I recommend using a light-colored, worsted-weight yarn for beginners, as it allows you to observe and accurately count your stitches easily. A 5 to 6 mm crochet hook is a great choice for working with worsted-weight yarn, as it provides a comfortable grip and makes working with the yarn more manageable.

I used Bernat Maker Home Dec yarn in the photo tutorials below and a 6 mm crochet hook size.

Before we deep dive into the sc stitch, save this ultimate guide for later!

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How to Make a Single Crochet: Step-by-Step Guide

Step 1: Insert your hook into the next stitch under both top loops of the stitch.

Step 2: Yarn over the yarn over the hook, from back to front, and pull up a loop through the stitch. You have two loops on the hook.

Step 3: Yarn over the yarn over the hook again and pull through both loops on the hook. You have one loop on your hook.

how to crochet regular single crochet stitch

How to Single Crochet into a Foundation Chain

  1. Start with a slip knot and make a foundation chain of 11.

  2. Insert your hook into the second chain from the hook.

  3. Yarn over and pull up a loop. You should now have two loops on your hook.

  4. Yarn over again. Pull the yarn through both loops on the hook.

how to work sc into a foundation chain

Congratulations, you’ve just made your first single crochet stitch!

Continue working SC stitches into each remaining nine chains across by rep steps 2-5. At the end of the row, you will have a total of 10 stitches. Because the first chain does not count as a stitch.

first row of single crochet stitch

How to work a single crochet in rows

how to work sc in rows

To start a new single crochet row, simply chain 1 (also known as a turning chain) and turn your work so that you are now working into the stitches of the previous row. The chain 1 does not count as a stitch.

The turning chain helps to elevate your yarn to the correct height for the next row, ensuring that your stitches are even and consistent.

Starting a New Row

Once you’ve completed the first row, you’re ready to flip your work and start on a new row. This means you’ll be working on the stitches you made in the previous row.

  1. Start by chaining one and turning your work clockwise.

  2. Insert your hook into the first stitch.

  3. Yarn over and pull up a loop.

  4. Yarn over and pull through both loops on the hook.

  5. Work one single crochet in each stitch across.

  6. To start a new row, ch1, turn your work and work one single crochet in each stitch till the end of the row.

how to work a sc into another row

How to count single crochet stitch

There are two methods to count SC stitches. The first one is horizontally at the end of the last finished row and vertically with the crochet fabric/project in front of us.

For the single crochet stitch chain 1 at the beginning does NOT count as a stitch if not stated otherwise. So we do NOT count it as a stitch.

The loop on the hook does NOT count as a stitch as well.

Method 1:

This is the easiest way to count for most of the crochet stitches. In this method, we count the horizontal v on top of the stitch. It looks more like a horizontal ” > ” shape as you can see in the photo below.

how to count single crochet stitch

Method 2

For method two, we will count the stitches vertically. To do so, place the crochet fabric/ swatch in front of you. You will see that the single crochet stitch looks different in the front side rows then the back side rows. See the photo below.

how to count sc stitches in rows

The stitches in the right side rows have a V shape placed vertically. So you, count them. Don’t forget that the chain 1 does NOT count as a stitch.

For the wrong side rows, the single crochet stitch looks more like the ” pi ” shape. So, here you count each ” pi ” as a stitch plus the last stitch, after the row’s very last ” pi ”. In the wrong side rows, the last single crochet does not look like ” pi ” but we count it as a stitch.

How to count single crochet rows

After you are familiar with what the single crochet stitch looks like for the wrong and right side rows, you can count the total rows’ number easily. See photo below.

How to count single crochet rows

Increasing and Decreasing Single Crochet Stitches

In this section, I’ll provide instructions for making single crochet increases and decreases so you can easily tackle more advanced projects.

How to Do a Single Crochet Increase

A single crochet increase is a technique used to add an extra stitch to your row or round, effectively widening your crochet piece.

In some patterns, it is abbreviated as ” 2 sc in next st ” or ” inc’ ‘. Here, ” inc ” means to make 2 single crochet stitches in the next stitch.

To make a single crochet increase, simply work two single crochet stitches into one stitch. This will increase your stitch count by one, allowing you to create shape and volume in your crochet projects, whether you’re working with single crochet stitches or double crochet stitches.

Single crochet increases are particularly useful for projects like hats, bags, and garments that require a gradual increase in size.

how to single crochet increase

Single Crochet Decrease

A single crochet decrease, on the other hand, is used to reduce the number of stitches in your row or round, effectively narrowing your crochet piece.

To make a single crochet decrease, you need to work two stitches that are next to each other together. This will result in one stitch and will reduce your stitch count by one, allowing you to create shape and volume by eliminating extra stitches.

In some patterns, you will see that it is abbreviated as ” dec “ or ” sc2tog ”. Both of them mean that you should decrease by working the next two stitches together.

Single crochet decreases are essential for projects like amigurumi, where shaping is key to achieving a realistic and well-defined form.

how to do a single crochet decrease

How to single crochet decrease step-by-step

Here is how to work single crochet decrease in depth.

Step 1: Insert the hook into the next stitch, yarn over, and pull up a loop. You have 2 loops on the hook.

Step 2: Insert the hook into the next stitch, yarn over, and pull up a loop. You have 3 loops on the hook.

Step 3: Yarn over and pull through all the loops on the hook.

how to do a single crochet decrease

How to do invisible single crochet ( SC ) decrease

The invisible sc decrease is not as bulky as the regular decrease and it is perfect for amigurumi projects as well as for projects where you do not want the decreases to be visible. Here is step-by-step explanation how to do SC invisible decrease.

Step 1: Insert the hook into the front loop of the next stitch. You have 2 loops on the hook.

Step 2: Insert the hook into the front loop of the next stitch. You have 3 loops on the hook.

Step 3: Yarn over and pull through the first two loops on the hook. You have 2 loops on the hook.

Step 4: Yarn over and pull through the two loops on the hook.

how to do invisible single crochet decrease

How to Single Crochet in the Round

Single crochet isn’t solely confined to rows; it can equally be worked in the round to formulate circular or tube-shaped pieces. This technique is incredibly useful to create a wide variety of crochet projects, including:

  • Hats

  • Bags

  • Amigurumi

  • and more.

The difference between joined rounds and continuous rounds

In this section, we’ll explore the two main methods of working single crochet in the round: joined rounds and continuous rounds.

Joined Rounds

Joined rounds are a method of working single crochet in the round where each round is closed with a slip stitch join. It creates a seamless transition between rounds and is ideal for projects where a clean, uninterrupted circle is desired.

To work SC in joined rounds, follow these steps:

  1. Form a ring or circle.

  2. Work your stitches into the round, and join the last stitch of the round to the first stitch with a slip stitch.

  3. Then, Chain 1 to start the next round.( Chain 1 does not count as a stitch )

  4. Begin your next round by making a sc in the same stitch as the slip-stitch join.

PRO TIP: When working in joined rounds, after the last stitch, you will see the slip stitch join from the previous round. This is not a real stitch. You should skip it, and also skip the ch 1 to join your round to the first stitch.

how to do a slip stitch join method

Continuous Rounds

Continuous rounds, also known as spiral rounds, are a technique for working single crochet in the round without joining the last stitch of the round to the first stitch. This creates a crochet piece without any visible seams, making it perfect for projects like amigurumi or top-down hats.

To work single crochet in continuous rounds, follow these steps:

  1. Start by forming a ring or circle.

  2. Work your stitches into the round without joining the last stitch of the round to the first stitch.

  3. When starting each new round, do NOT slip stitch to join, and do NOT chain 1. Work your first stitch into the first SC stitch of the previous row.

As there will not be a visible seem, it is recommended to place a stitch marker to indicate the beginning of each round to ensure you don’t lose track of your stitches.

Variations of SC stitch

As we discussed earlier in this post, the SC stitch has a horizontal v shape on top of the stitch. And we call them both top loops of the stitch. But we know these two loops also as a front loop of a stitch and the back loop of a stitch.

what are the front and back loops of a stitch

To identify them the easiest way is to know that when you lay the crochet piece in front of you, the closest loop is the front loop of the stitch and the other one which is further away is the back loop.

So, using these loops, you can create a variations of the standard single crochet stitch.

SC in the back loop only

SC in back loop only is abbreviated as SC BLO and is a variation of SC, mostly used to create ribbing for garments, blankets and hats.

The difference from the normal SC is that, you work each stitch into the back loop only, instead of inserting the hook through the both top loops. See the previous photo.

SC in the front loop only

SC in front loop only is abbreviated as SC FLO and is another variation of SC. The difference with the standard SC is that you insert your hook into the front loop only, not the both top loops as usual.

FAQ and Troubleshooting Common Beginner Issues

Like any new skill, learning to single crochet can occasionally pose challenges.

In this section, I’ll address common issues that beginners may face and answer some questions like:

Why are my edges not straight?

Why does my crochet get smaller or bigger?

Why my stitches are uneven?

So, the simpliest answers to those questions is that you are adding or subtracting stitches while you crochet. And here is how to avoid it:

As a BEGINNER in crochet, the best way is to place a stitch marker on the first stitch and the last stitch of a row. This way you will know exactly where to work your stitches and will avoid adding or skipping them.

The other way is consistently to count your stitches.

I know that at the beginning it can be overwhelming but it is better to loose some time counting, than frogging the whole piece you put your heart in. ( I have been there. )

Uneven Stitches

Uneven stitches appears from inconsistent tension and stitch count. To maintain even stitches, follow these tips:

  1. Hold your yarn with a firm but relaxed grip.

  2. Try to keep the tension consistent as you work across each row.

  3. Count your stitches at the end of each row to ensure you haven’t added or dropped any stitches.

Curling edges in crochet

The issue with the curling edges mostly happens when you make your foundation chain too tight.

To avoid this, use a bigger hook for the foundation chain and then switch to a smaller hook. For example, use a 5 mm hook for the chain stitch and 4.5 mm crochet hook for the rest of your project.

By following these steps, you can achieve more consistent and even stitches in your crochet projects.

More crochet stitches and crochet guides

  1. How to work a modified sc2tog
  2. How to crochet a granny square- step-by-step guide for beginners
  3. How to crochet a magic ring for beginners

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Step-by-step guide how to single crochet for beginners

How to crochet a single crochet stitch

Shortly, here is how to work single crochet stitch

Step 1. Insert hook into the next stitch ( or the indicated stitch ), yarn over, and pull up a loop. Step 2. Yarn over again and pull through both loops on the hook.

Materials

  • Yarn

Tools

  • stitch markers ( optional )
  • Crochet hook
  • Scissors

Instructions

  1. Start with a slip knot and make a foundation chain of 11.
  2. Insert your hook into the second chain from the hook.
  3. Yarn over and pull up a loop. You should now have two loops on your hook.
  4. Yarn over again. Pull the yarn through both loops on the hook.
  5. Continue working SC stitches into each remaining nine chains across by rep steps 2-5. At the end of the row, you will have a total of 10 stitches because the first chain does not count as a stitch.

To start a new single crochet row, simply chain 1 (also known as a turning chain) and turn your work so that you are now working into the stitches of the previous row. The chain one does not count as a stitch.

  1. Start by chaining 1 and turning your work clockwise.
  2. Insert your hook into the first stitch.
  3. Yarn over and pull up a loop.
  4. Yarn over and pull through all the loops on the hook.
  5. Work one single crochet in each stitch across. You should have ten stitches in total.

To start a new row, in ch1, turn your work and work one single crochet in each stitch till the end of the row. Repeat steps 1-5 above to work as many rows as you wish.

        Notes

        If you would like to learn:

        • how to work a single crochet in rows
        • how to work single crochet in rounds
        • how to increase
        • how to decrease
        • how to count SC stitches and rows
        • and how to avoid common mistakes

        Check the rest of the blog post. Happy crocheting!

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